Updating the system bios

Community Q&A A computer's Basic Input-Output System (BIOS) is embedded software on a motherboard.

It is the first software your PC loads so that it can use things like CD drives, mice, and keyboards practically from the moment you turn it on.

The BIOS version number is displayed on the System Summary pane. Different motherboards use different utilities and procedures, so there’s no one-size-fits-all set of instructions here.

However, you’ll perform the same basic process on all motherboards.

To use a command, open a Command Prompt window — press Windows Key R, type cmd into the Run dialog, and press Enter.

Run the following command: You can also find your BIOS’s version number in the System Information window.

Computers are now coming with UEFI firmware instead of the traditional BIOS, but the same is true for UEFI – it’s low-level system software with a similar role.

Unlike your operating system (which is stored on your hard drive), your computer’s BIOS is stored on a chip on your motherboard.

If you specifically need this new hardware, then it’s probably worth taking the risk to install it.

If not, then you should simply stick with your current BIOS because the new BIOS won’t make any difference and could actually cause more problems.

These updates can be “flashed” onto the BIOS chip, replacing the BIOS software the computer came with with a new version of the BIOS.

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